RizWords – Daily Politics and Tech
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There’s this really interesting meme running through the blogosphere right now… Essentially the Drama Pot was stirred by who else? Jason Calacanis. The headlines and blurbs from different perspectives tell the story:

Technorati all a’twitter over telephone interview

From Jason C.: WIRED journo won’t do email interviews—ironic. — A WIRED journalist pinged me for some comments on Michael Arrington and his A-list blogger status. I told the journalist to send me the questions by email and he refused. He said Dave Winer did the same thing.

From Dylan Tweney: Calacanis Won’t Do Phone Interview — Cowardly — Jason McCabe Calacanis is complaining about a Wired reporter who wants to do an interview with him, but refuses to do it via email. He says it’s “ironic” that a magazine covering the digital age refuses to use email for its interviews. — Ironic?

From David Winer Transcription errors — Jason Calacanis was contacted by the same reporter who contacted me. I’m mentioned in Jason’s post, but somewhere along the line there was a transcription error. I did not offer to do the interview via email, I made a different offer. — Here’s what I said: “Not generally doing interviews these days.

Good laws, bad laws, laws as big as your head… Art cut me off on this story… said I was boring. You decide:

Wait, There Are Good Internet Laws?
Law professor Eric Goldman has written up an article where he wanted to list out the best and worst internet-related laws out there. Coming up with “good” ones turned out to be a challenge, with just the law banning new internet access taxes and section 230 of the CDA making the list. Of course, you could argue that the safe harbor afforded by section 230 (protecting sites from the actions of their users) is based on so much common sense that there shouldn’t need to be a law to back it up. Of course, when it comes to the “bad” list, there were way too many to choose from. The DMCA makes a couple of appearances (for different parts) and there are some other blasts from the past as well. It’s pretty frustrating to read through the list, in part because so many of the “bad” laws aren’t just bad, but were obviously bad from when they were proposed. Lots of people have pointed out why those laws would do more harm than good, but so far, politicians don’t seem interested in correcting the mistakes they made with them. They passed the laws so they could claim they stopped some “bad” thing from happening online, even if the law did no such thing. It would be nice if politicians were actually held accountable for the unintended consequences of their bad laws — especially when those laws do little to actually achieve what they were proposed to do.

MySpace Turns it’s Lonely Eyes to Washington:

Law professor Eric Goldman has written up an article where he wanted to list out the best and worst internet-related laws out there. Coming up with “good” ones turned out to be a challenge, with just the law banning new internet access taxes and section 230 of the CDA making the list. Of course, you could argue that the safe harbor afforded by section 230 (protecting sites from the actions of their users) is based on so much common sense that there shouldn’t need to be a law to back it up. Of course, when it comes to the “bad” list, there were way too many to choose from. The DMCA makes a couple of appearances (for different parts) and there are some other blasts from the past as well. It’s pretty frustrating to read through the list, in part because so many of the “bad” laws aren’t just bad, but were obviously bad from when they were proposed. Lots of people have pointed out why those laws would do more harm than good, but so far, politicians don’t seem interested in correcting the mistakes they made with them. They passed the laws so they could claim they stopped some “bad” thing from happening online, even if the law did no such thing. It would be nice if politicians were actually held accountable for the unintended consequences of their bad laws — especially when those laws do little to actually achieve what they were proposed to do.

And speaking of social networking:

Social Networks Are The New Porn

Since the rise of the internet in the 1990s, pornography has ruled the internet. While difficult to measure accurately, the online pornography industry

msaleem_sngreatersex.gif

is estimated to be wort
h about $1 billion, and cou
nts for about 13% of website visits in America (compared to search engines, which account for 7%). But it appears that new uses are about to overtake pornography in terms of online popularity.

The Economist is reporting that according to Hitwise data, pornography-related web activity is decreasing in America (as a proportion of total visits), as more and more people are opting to participate in social networking sites such as MySpace, Bebo and Facebook. Since the data presented is limited to February, a definitive conclusion is hard to make, but traffic to these social networking sites may have already overtaken traffic to sex-related sites, and if not, will probably do so any day now.

…pornographic content is often the first to take advantage of new media, from photography to videocassettes to satellite television. “Sex is a virus that infects new technology first,” as Wired put it back in 1993. Once a new medium becomes popular, its usage is no longer dominated by porn.

The resulting implication is that the internet has matured as a medium for disseminating information, and therefore people are switching from using the internet for pornography to other uses.

Start the rejoicing, another loudmouth silenced:

It’s True — Rosie will leave the “View!!”
Filed under: TV, The View, Rosie O’Donnell TMZ has now confirmed the buzz that we exclusively reported last night: Rosie O’Donnell will announce on today’s show that she is leaving “The View.” And TMZ has confirmed that “View” honchos are already searching for her replacement.

Stay tuned!