image You don’t often see me defend Techcrunch. Mark it on your calendars, though, because you’re going to see it today.

I’m also going to defend Slashdot, Ars Technica, and what’s left of Valleywag.

Time Magazine, or what’s left of that Old Media deathtrap has put together a list of the five most over-rated blogs. Guess what genre of blog dominates that list? If you guessed tech, you’re pretty decent at counting.

Here’s some of what they say:

Techcrunch
Launched by lawyer and tech investor Michael Arrington in 2005,TechCrunch became one of the world’s most popular blogs by reporting on the movers and shakers of Silicon Valley. But take a look at the Valley these days: Nothing’s moving. Nothing’s shaking. Born of a boom that’s long since gone bust, TechCrunch now seems irrelevant. Recent headlines such as “Box.net Hones In On Businesses With New Social Features” aren’t helping. Stick a fork in this one — it’s done.

Ars Technica
A perennially top-rated blog that bills itself as covering “the art of technology.” Verdict: too much technology. Hardly any art. And lose the fruity name.

Slashdot
Reading Slashdot these days is like visiting the IT guy at work. He’s infuriatingly smug and cares passionately about stuff you don’t care about, and views your lack of interest as further confirmation of his intellectual superiority. Enjoy.

It’s all coming back, and this time it has me a bit blindsided. I had figured that technology had achieved some sort of penetration point – enough social networks had gone mainstream so that idea that the technology business is root of all evil was an idea that had permanently died.

In a world where the very blogs that Time decries are crowding them out as sources of information people care about, maybe I shouldn’t be surprised that they’ve created yet another linkbaiting article, but I have to wonder what it is that makes them think they’re that free to so handily toss tech under the bus.

Is tech due for the PR deathspiral it was in after the first big bust?