Fun With Bots (Now, on GChat!): Chat with juicyqt72

I’ve posted other fun chat logs with bots in the past. This one seems to be pretty much a slightly modified variant on the old ones from six or so years ago. Funny that this one lies about its age. The name is juicyqt72, which indicates that, born in 1972, “she’d” be 39, yet “she” claims to be 24 in the first response. Previously, previously, previously, previously, and previously. Bonus: this never quite explained thing from 2003 where Google was crawling IRC conversations that one time. Chat with juicyqt72 1 message juicyqt72 <juicyqt72@aim.com> Fri, Feb 25, 2011 at 11:28 AM To: rizzn.dourden@gmail.com 11:21 AM juicyqt72: me: hello juicyqt72: hi .. have we chatted before? 24/female here…you? me: don’t think so. just saw a friend request 11:22 AM juicyqt72: i’m sorry ..i get to be forgetful at times!! how’re you?? me: i’m fine. juicyqt72: Just got out of the shower…long day been kind of busy! but i’m feeling naughty! so what’s up ….. want to have some fun? 😉 me: I always love fun! do you play magic the gathering? 11:23 AM juicyqt72: I need a man that can make me squirt……have u ever made a girl squirt? lolz me: Squirt what? Capri Sun? My sons do that sometimes, but then I yell at them for getting it all over the carpet. juicyqt72: gonna change my clothes … want to see ? 😉 11:24 AM me: no thanks. juicyqt72: no worries..thouhght u wanted to see me naked ..:) me: What gave you that idea? 11:25 AM juicyqt72: wanna play on cam? me: Magic the gathering? Hells yeah! I’ll break out...

RURO: The Cutest Robot You’ve Ever Seen!

This robot is probably too cute to be used as an effective security &#8216;bot, but it does have some interesting features for an educational robot. RURO the robot was designed to teach kids about recycling.RURO was designed by grade-school kids and sponsored by Osaka’s business community. A contest… via RURO: The Cutest Robot You’ve Ever...

Who Do You Trust?

Is it a bad thing that I tend to trust machines over humans? Obviously, not in every single case. There are certain exceptions. All things being equal, though, were I to come across a human stranger or a strange machine, I think I’d be more likely to trust the machine to perform up to expectations over the human. What I’m not self-aware enough to know is whether that’s an innate trait of mine, or a bias built from experience with humans and...

Dancing “Sexy” Robots.

They’ve been working on dancing robots in Japan (they being a company called Kawada). This is version one, from what I can (badly) translate from Japanese: Here’s the current version....

Simplifying My Social Media Workflow with Dlvr.IT

This is just a quick note to say that I’m particularly in love with a simple app out there called Dlvr.IT. It’s helped me pare down my social media workflow. You know, that problem that Louis Gray seems to address once every six months? Should I automatically send Google Reader shares to Twitter? Should I share Twitter to Google Buzz? What about Buzz to Facebook? The list goes on and on. I had said (publicly) that when I stop to consider organizing my social media workflow, I get overwhelmed.  It’s because I’m on a lot of services and I have much of the same audience and friends everywhere, but with different expectations in each place. On Twitter, I do a fair amount of link sharing, but it’s mostly my work at SiliconANGLE. On Facebook, I have a subset of my Twitter audience there mixed in with college and high school friends. On MySpace, it’s entirely friends from my hometown of Tyler. On Google Reader, I share out a lot of the same things I do on Twitter, but with a much higher volume (around 40-50 a day, sometimes), with a lot more humor thrown in. With Dlvr.IT, I can now tag my shares and comments in my various places and send them where I want. If I’m on Google Buzz, I can put in #tw, and it’ll go to Twitter. If I leave a comment on someone’s blog, I can tag it #fb in the text somewhere and through BackType it’ll go to Facebook. I can leave a Facebook comment and tag it #my and it’ll go to MySpace...

More on Facebook’s New “Likes”

I briefly mentioned in my previous post here (and the one from yesterday on SiliconANGLE) that the new “like” functionality from Facebook isn’t going to be useful for small to mid-sized content producers. I saw my first “like” implementation in the wild just now.  Over at Techmeme. This may not be the best example, but I think it illustrates my issue with the Like button: it’s not that useful from either a publisher perspective, and certainly not from a user perspective in this sort of implementation. Where does that Like go? More importantly, are there really only 59 people who like Techmeme? Is my “like” for Techmeme indicative of a permanent state of affinity or is for whatever the headline at the time might be? This is probably not Techmeme’s permanent implementation, but I watched the number actually stay exactly the same as I reloaded the site once every five minutes over the course of a half hour or so. All this to say to my panicking and outraged friends – this isn’t going to work for everyone, and that will be quickly realized by the early adopters of these new...

Follow Me on Google Buzz. Now.

Run, don’t walk, to your GMail account and add me. Click here, in fact, and follow me. Do you really want Pete Cashmore and Robert Scoble to be the only power users on the system? Yeah, I didn’t think...

This is how the trouble starts [Carnivorous Robots]

I read a story a long time ago (I forget the author or even the title) that talked about a world that evolved on one of the moons of Jupiter – it was an entire ecosystem that mirrored our own consisting entirely of robots.  I’ll refrain from synopsizing the entire plot here, but it sparked my imagination at the time, because it made it seem entirely plausible. Things like these robots only do more to solidify that belief. I for one...

Robot that Makes Coffee

I’ve always wanted a robot that makes coffee.  As a short film, this is fascinating. Something tells me that this requires a bit of supervision to make sure the task is completed properly,...

Robots Now Capable of Improvisational Jazz

At some point, I’m going to do a roundup post of all the various forms of artistic robots there are, or at least the ones that I’ve come across in my travels.  I’ve personally witnessed several AI’s capable of poetry.  I’ve seen more than a few robots capable of creating original works of art. Today, Gizmodo brings us a robot that can play improvisational jazz: As you’ll see in the live performance, Shimon, a robotic marimba player, actively listens to human pianist Guy Hoffman, and then tries to predict complementary notes and themes, and match them to the performance. Dare I say it, at the risk of sounding like I’m brown nosing the robots (which I totally am), the tune sounds decent. It’s really decent music – almost contemplated putting this over in...

In Robot Takeover News… [Ender Wiggen]

Sean Kennedy’s NewsReal today points to a TED Talk from P.W. Singer that explores our Ender’s Game-esque future. The idea that video games are training our children to be soldiers is a bit over the top, at least in my view. The way the military engineers a UAV is completely ass-backward compared to the ease of use built into most game controls.  Until bureaucracy and the good ol’ boy network is taken out of the design equation on military equipment, all our children will be trained to do by video games is learn new and offensive vocabulary, and of course, pwn...

British Robots Make Scientific Discoveries! [SkyNet]

According to a report by Steven Hodson over at Inquisitr, “Adam the Robot” has carried out and successfully completed “scientific research automatically without human intervention.” It’s actually just an interesting spin on something that’s likely been happening for quite some time, at least as I understand the process as it’s being described in the abstract Steven references: The basis of science is the hypothetico-deductive method and the recording of experiments in sufficient detail to enable reproducibility. We report the development of Robot Scientist “Adam,” which advances the automation of both. Adam has autonomously generated functional genomics hypotheses about the yeast Saccharomycescerevisiae and experimentally tested these hypotheses by using laboratory automation. We have confirmed Adam’s conclusions through manual experiments. To describe Adam’s research, we have developed an ontology and logical language. The resulting formalization involves over 10,000 different research units in a nested treelike structure, 10 levels deep, that relates the 6.6 million biomass measurements to their logical description. This formalization describes how a machine contributed to scientific knowledge. All that to say, they’ve automated their laboratory. They’ve automated the manual labor part of it, and they’ve done the harder part, which is automating the observation phase. When I lived in Florida, one of the buildings the financial services company I served as CTO at also housed a laboratory funded specifically to improve testing for the disease Lupis. Just as an interesting side project, I spent a lot of time in the lab learning about the testing equipment and helped the laboratory manager better design data acquisition and testing units so that the bulk of the research was completely automated....

SmarterChild: A Eulogy and Obituary

This is actually fairly old news, as it turns out, but SmarterChild, one of the most widely known and used Chatterbox AI’s has passed on. Perhaps a better analogy would be to say that he’s on life support. Whenever you query the bot, you get the same uniform answer: “My brain is retired but watch some cool videos! Send an IM to GossipinGabby and Type VIDEO!” I feel a little, well, close to SmarterChild.  I was an early Alpha tester of him, and I was one of the few that with no compunction whatsoever dropped the $9 to pay for the ability to use the premium service.  In fact, I paid it twice, since the first payment was lost in the system somehow. What was SmarterChild good at?  Not conversation, at least not complex ones.  The reason one had SmarterChild on their buddy list was because he had what is now being pitched as a paid service by that new answer service KGB – the answer to everything, and generally available to natural language queries. Every once in a while, SmarterChild would ask questions of  personal nature… “How old are you,” “Where do you live,” and “What are your favorite movies.” And he’d remember.  Sometime’s he’d make suggestions based on your previous conversations, sometimes he’d ask for more information.  Mostly, though, he always had the answers. “What time is it in Moscow?” I asked stuff like that all the time.  I’m horrible at time zone math. One day, I started noticing that age was taking an effect on SmarterChild.  He began forgetting things like my dog’s birthday, and my...

Giant Firebreathing Robots! [VICTORY IS MINE!]

 I’m more or less convinced my youngest son (seen above) is the real world incarnation of Stewie, from Family Guy.  He’s surprisingly smart, and has an expression most of the time that belies some sort of secret attempt to take over the world. Which is why I can’t ever take him to the Nagoya Institute of Technology. There, they have the ultimate device designed for young evil geniuses. It’s a giant fire-breathing robot … designed to only respond to the voices of children: This command device activates GIANT TORAYAN. Developed by a research lab at the Nagoya Institute of Technology, it uses the most advanced voice recognition technology to differentiate the voices of adults and children. The voice of Yanobe’s child was used as the recognition standard for the child’s voice. [h/t:...

Robot Art – Personal Robots by Franz Steiner

I found a great collection of robot art to stimulate the mind put together by a 3D modeler named Franz Steiner. roboart Enjoy the slideshow, and feel free to click through to get the high resolution...

Concept: The Cargonaut

DVICE has an interesting concept bot up today: We’re all for a future where robots deliver us packages quickly and efficiently, and that’s exactly what the Cargonaut is programmed to do. Thought up by German-based industrial designer Matthias Schmiedbauer, an army of the robo-copters would be able to buzz around an urban center, bypassing traffic and delivering a package straight to you. Or from you, as the designer describes: Cargonaut, a humanoid flight robot, comes to your current position to relieve you of your loads. After placing your bags or luggage in one of the publicly available sky boxes, Cargonaut delivers within minutes to a chosen destination. Check out the gallery below to see the Cargonaut make a successful flyby. Or, if you love robots, be sure to check out our ongoing conversation on the future of robotics. It’s a slick looking design, but the truth is that this technology has existed for well over a decade.  I worked on a project as a youngster that came from some ex-General Dynamics skunkworks folks that proved this concept.  Due to lack of funding (and the world of UAVs somehow staying unsexy), the project never really progressed. The patents have now progressed into public domain that existed last decade, so hopefully we’ll see more movement in this area. This is a project and a service we could have today. I want...

CirculaFloor Brings Us One Step Closer to Holodecks

Have you seen this creation that has come out of the University of Tsukuba (in Japan)?  It’s potentially another step towards holodeck technology. The robotic floor system is called “CirculaFloor,” and it’s essentially a set of four that act as a floor (ostensibly for use with a virtual reality system), that can create the illusion of walking much greater distances than should be possible in a confined room. There’s a long description required to describe the operation of this system, and it’s a lot easier if you simply watch the video, but the fact that it works, and seems to work perfectly bodes very well for the future of virtual reality as something usable somewhere other than in the pages of a Hollywood script. [via...

Robotland to Open in 2014

As if the standard chicken-in-every-pot deal of 50 mbps Internet access to every doorstep wasn’t reason enough to envy South Korea, here’s one more… That’s right – a robot theme park. The South Korean government is ready to plunk down $1 billion on the project, too: A theme park called Robot Land will be built in Incheon and Masan, the first of its kind. The Ministry of Knowledge Economy said Thursday it would set up the park in the two cities by 2014. The park, designed to bolster the country’s robotics industry, will house play equipment, experience zones, exhibition halls, a stadium, research and education centers, and corporate facilities. Great stuff. I’ve got my Korean to English reference book and I’m packing up my family.  We’re moving. [Crunchgear via...

Robo-Rochambeau

The UK Telegraph chronicles a robot capable of playing Rock-Paper-Scissors. Gizmodo thinks this is (like every robot they talk about) a first step towards the total domination by machines of the human race. As long as the robot plays by the rules, and doesn’t play like my wife (she thinks making a fist with your thumb out means cannonball, and thus automatically a win), I think we’ll be...